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Abengoa baling feeder

Abengoa Opens Commercial-Scale 2G Biorefinery

Abengoa baling feederAbengoa has opened its second-generation cellulosic ethanol plant in Hugoton, Kansas.

The biorefinery finished construction in mid-August and began producing cellulosic ethanol at the end of September with the capacity to produce up to 25 million gallons per year.

The plant utilizes only “second generation” biomass feedstocks for ethanol production, meaning non-edible agricultural crop residues (such as stalks and leaves) that do not compete with food or feed grain. The facility also features an electricity cogeneration component allowing it to operate as a self-sufficient renewable energy producer. By utilizing residual biomass solids from the ethanol conversion process, the plant generates 21 MW of electricity, enough to power itself and provide excess renewable power to the local Stevens County community.

The Hugoton plant opening also marks the first-ever commercial deployment of Abengoa’s proprietary enzymatic hydrolysis technology, which turns biomass into fermentable sugars that are then converted to ethanol. Among the first wave of commercial-scale ethanol plants in the country, Hugoton builds on recent industry momentum showcasing cellulosic ethanol as a sustainable alternative fuel source that reduces greenhouse gas emissions and increases energy independence.

The plant also provides a platform for the company’s future development of other bioproducts that reduce petroleum use, such as bioplastics, biochemicals and drop-in jet fuel.

Abengoa received a $132.4 million loan guarantee and a $97 million grant through the Department of Energy to support construction of the Hugoton facility.

At full capacity, the Hugoton facility will process 1,000 tons per day of biomass, most of which is harvested within a 50-mile radius each year — providing $17 million per year of extra income for local farmers whose agricultural waste would otherwise have little or no value. Of that biomass, more than 80 percent is expected to consist of irrigated corn stover, with the remainder comprised of wheat straw, milo stubble and switchgrass.

Earlier this month DuPont and Procter & Gamble announced a collaboration that will use cellulosic ethanol in North American Tide laundry detergent. Tide Cold Water will be the first brand in the world to blend cellulosic ethanol in a scalable and commercial way, the companies say.

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