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15% Of U.S. Consumers Very or Extremely Likely To Buy Plug-In Hybrids

Do Americans Want the Same as Consumers in Europe When it Comes to Plug-In Hybrids?
Fifteen percent of U.S. consumers are very or extremely likely to purchase a vehicle that has plug-in hybrid technology, not taking into account estimated market prices, according to Harris Interactive’s AutoTECHCAST U.S. study. For Europeans, it’s 15 percent, according to the AutoTECHCAST Europe study.

The study reveals that 30 percent of European consumers who are likely to purchase the plug-in hybrid technology in their next vehicle expect to charge it at least once a day or more. Once the vehicle is plugged in, they expect to charge it for around 5.1 hours. A similar study in the U.S. shows that Americans expect to charge their vehicles slightly more often than their European counterparts – 56 percent anticipated charging their car at least once daily and for approximately 6 hours at a time.

The convenience of plugging in a vehicle every night instead of filling it up at the gas station every week is very appealing to plug-in hybrid considerers, with 72 percent of respondents in Europe preferring the plug-in option.

The study also highlights that further consideration is needed of the infrastructure required to support a population of plug-in hybrid vehicles. Among the European consumers surveyed, 21 percent of those considering buying a plug-in hybrid indicate that they currently park on the street when at home.

In addition to the plug-in hybrid engine, Europeans also show significant interest in the Start-Stop System technology. Before market prices are brought into the equation, a quarter (27%) of those surveyed said they would be very or extremely likely to purchase the Start-Stop System technology for their next vehicle.

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