If you've no account register here first time
User Name :
User Email :
Password :

Login Now

Johnson & Johnson Emissions Rise 3%

jj-image2On the back of efforts to source 34 percent of its electricity from renewables and building the largest corporate hybrid car fleet in the U.S., Johnson & Johnson has been able to cut its emissions 9 percent, when compared to a 1990 baseline. During the same time period, the multinational’s global sales have risen 400 percent, according to Johnson & Johnson’s new sustainability report.

However, while the company sources 34 percent of its electricity from renewable sources, that number actually has been dropping, as the chart above indicates. At the same time, the company’s net emissions also are rising.

Johnson & Johnson has 2,100 hybrid vehicles in its fleet, and has been able to reduce hazardous and non-hazardous waste generation in its facilities 16 percent from 2005 to 2008.

Additionally, the conglomerate has developed a new product lifecycle, which should help its various companies identify ways to make their products more sustainable.

As an example of its progression toward more sustainable packaging, the report cites the ubiquitious Band-Aid. In 2007, the Brazilian box supplier switched from non-certified paperboard to paperboard certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. Currently the company aims to reduce the size of the carton. Next year, Johnson & Johnson hopes to add post-consumer recycled content to the package.

Additionally, the company is working to eliminate PVC from its packaging. Here’s a look at benchmarks.

jj-pvcThe company also is working to reduce its water usage. This chart shows its progress.

jj-waterFinally, here’s a look at Johnson & Johnson’s investments in energy reduction projects.

jj-invest

The Corporate Sustainability Professional's Guide to Better Data Management
Sponsored By: Urjanet

  
Is Energy-From-Waste Worse Than Coal?
Sponsored By: Covanta Environmental Solutions

  
How to Unsilo Your EHS Data
Sponsored By: Progressly

  
EHS Special Report
Sponsored By: Environmental Leader

  

Leave a Comment