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Intel, PepsiCo Top Green Power Purchasers

wind-on-the-water2In EPA’s most recent ranking of Fortune 500 companies that purchase renewable energy, Intel comes out on top, edging out PepsiCo by about 75 million kWh.

The list, which compares annualized renewable energy purchases, is known as the Fortune 500 Challenge.

Here are the top 10, with their annual purchases, renewable energy provider and type of renewables purchased:

fortune-500-greenpowerIn other news, EPA’s latest rankings of the top-20 users of on-site renewable energy put Kimberley Clark on top with more than 192 million kilowatt hours, comprising about 7 percent of its total electricity needs. The paper product giant uses a biomass generator.

The next three positions on the list were occupied by cities. Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts generates 172 million kWh, for 54 percent of its needs, using biogas. San Diego produces 69 million kWh, or about 27 percent of its needs, using biogas, hydro and solar. And the San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant generates 52 million kWh, or about 56 percent of its needs, using biogas.

Coming in at No. 5 is Cal Portland, an industrial products company in Glendora, Calif., that generates 50 million kWh, or 11 percent of its needs, using wind.

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One thought on “Intel, PepsiCo Top Green Power Purchasers

  1. Pepsi and the other makers of soft drinks are also massive consumers of scarce water supplies, let alone the huge energy and material requirements of their bottling plants and the carbon emissions of their fleets of distribution vehicles. All for a product whose benefits to mankind are questionable, to say the least. So what can be done in free societies to curb such resource-guzzling businesses? Maybe the Chinese will show the way?

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