If you've no account register here first time
User Name :
User Email :
Password :

Login Now

Recology Partners with CPSC to Support Product Stewardship

Recology is partnering with California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC) to support the organization’s efforts to develop relationships with product manufacturers to reduce waste at the source.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), or Product Stewardship, ensures that products and packaging are designed from the start to be recyclable. It also drives manufacturers to design products so they can be reused and eliminate all unnecessary packaging.

Recology operates several materials recovery facilities in California and coordinates programs recovering a variety of materials.

CPSC says Product Stewardship is a policy approach that shifts financial responsibility for end-of-life product management from government to all organizations involved in the product chain, which will also create more jobs in the private sector to collect and remanufacture materials.

According to CPSC, Californians spend more than $100 million annually to manage products that are banned from landfills, which the group says is economically unsustainable.

Leveraging EHS Software in Support of Culture Changes
Sponsored By: VelocityEHS

  
Operationalizing EHS Management: Bridge the Gap from Strategy to Execution
Sponsored By: LNS Research

  
Planning for a Sustainable Future
Sponsored By: Dakota Software

  
The Corporate Sustainability Professional's Guide to Better Data Management
Sponsored By: Urjanet

  

3 thoughts on “Recology Partners with CPSC to Support Product Stewardship

  1. Thank you for covering this story, but just one correction, Californian’s spend more than $100 million dollars annually to manage products banned from disposal, not $100,000.

  2. Greetings from the little town of Winnemucca, located in Northern Nevada and possibly the future home of a huge landfill full of Bay Area garbage.
    Recology obtained a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) in 2007 to construct and operate a square mile landfill 25 miles west of our town on a desert playa. They propose importing by train eight million pounds of non-recyclable garbage a day, five days a week for 95 years, and burying it in a hole in the ground thirty-five feet above the groundwater in an area known for high winds, flooding, and poor soils. They were given three years to obtain the necessary permits and begin construction.
    Fast forward three years. Only one permit has been granted, the air quality permit. Recology applied for an extension for their CUP and ultimately it was denied by the County Board of Commissioners due to Recology’s own malfeasance. Recology has chosen to sue the county and the commissioners for denying them their rights as property owners, when, in fact, Recology only has a lease on the property in question. Once the citizenry woke up to what was proposed in their neighborhood, an initiative petition was organized and signed by the county voters and, if unchallenged by Recology, it will go before the voters in November.
    These proceedings are front page news in this neck of the woods. But I wonder about the press coverage in the Bay Area; in the area this garbage would be coming from. Do these people know or care about what Recology would be dumping on us; where their trash would end up? How would they feel if the tables were turned? Recology has gone out of their way to portray themselves as a green, recycling company. Are they really? They want to dump everything that is not recyclable in our lap. There is no reason to assume that this barrage of garbage would stop with just one square mile of land since they have options on three or four more. All of this is verifiable by logging on to the website http://nolandfill.wordpress.com/.
    I would like to encourage you to delve into this and explore what is going on here. I think most of the folks in this area tend to think of people in California as environmentally conscious and people who try to do the right thing. I hope this is the case, and that they really care about what goes on outside their borders, especially regarding their garbage.

Leave a Comment