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Indiana Comes in Last on ‘Green’ State Ranking

Washington, Colorado, Massachusetts, New York, and California are the greenest states, according to a NMI survey of more than 3,000 U.S. consumers in the 25 largest states.

The least green states are Virginia, South Carolina, Ohio, Georgia, and Indiana. The survey is part of NMI’s U.S. LOHAS consumer report.

NMI says leading green states are known for pioneering new environmental policies, driving the marketing for green products and enjoying outdoor activities.

Study results can help marketers and product developers identify regions for test marketing, targeting and new product introductions, says NMI.  Marketersalso  may find that different states respond to different messaging and communication strategies. As an example, consumers in greener states are likely to respond to a global message on environmental responsibility and green living, while those in less green states will need more immediate and personal benefits, according to NMI.

Here’s the ranking of the 25 largest states from the most to the least greenest. The analysis is based on seven criteria: the proportion of consumers in each state who have purchased carbon offsets, organic foods, renewable power, and hybrid vehicles and those who compost, reuse grocery bags, and donate money to environmental groups.

–Washington

–Colorado

–Massachusetts

–New York

–California

–Maryland

–New Jersey

–Minnesota

–Michigan

–Missouri

–Florida

–Alabama

–Wisconsin

–Arizona

–Texas

–North Carolina

–Pennsylvania

–Illinois

–Louisiana

–Tennessee

–Virginia

–South Carolina

–Ohio

–Georgia

–Indiana

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17 thoughts on “Indiana Comes in Last on ‘Green’ State Ranking

  1. Your title for this article is really a disgrace…I don’t know Indiana from a hole in the wall, but they are only last on what I greatly suspect is a pathetic list of Green States. This is a very disturbing article. While I would realy like to know what the REAL top 25 Green States are, I am in complete disbelief that NMI’s survey is accurate…who did they survey and how many…I live in Alabama – I read about the number of fines Birmingham pays to the EPA for all the damage they have done to our environment…where are states like Vermont that could teach us all about being a “Green” sustainable and environmentally stable state? I expect better from Environmental Leader!!

  2. I would have to agree with Lori on this article. The headline is misleading at best. The list is only of 25 states, so Indiana may not be the worst. Also, in this day and age, basing this on a survey of only 3000 people is absurd. That quantity is less than a fraction of the population in even the smallest state. The headline should have been more general to reference results of 25 states for “greenness”…

  3. I would imagine that the issue you have is based in the fact they surveyed “consumers” who are often oblivious to the actual state of environmental conditions in their community. Rather they probably just rate how accessible green products are to purchase in the stores. So agreed, not a terribly useful document.

  4. Because I live in Indiana this article caught my attention immediately. I absolutely agree the title was misleading, no matter which state was #25. This is a type of headline I commonly see from a certain ‘news’ outlet and is not up to the normal standards of Evironmental Leader.

  5. Where is Oregon on this list? I believe it’s in the top 10 in terms of largest states and they certainly are doing green…and agree headline is misleading and not fair to Indiana.

  6. I agree with other comments – not much statistical substance to this ranking. The last comprehensive ranking of the states for sustainability was in a 2007 issue of Forbes Magazine. I keep looking for them to do it again. By the way, Indiana finished 49th in that Forbes survey.

    ~~A tree-hugging Hoosier

  7. Despite the growing wind farms, Indiana also generates a ridiculous amount of electricity with coal (not a factor in this very superficial survey). It’s why we can’t eat fish from our streams.

  8. I also live in Indiana and Disagree with this “survey”! Not only do we have the largest winfd farm in the nation, make hybrid and electric cars and their parts, and have many people driving said cars, but we also manufatcure parts for wind mills and solar energy too. So VERY bad article in my opinion.

  9. Almost every single one of the “greenest” states has multiple nuclear power plants. (Indiana, ranked at the bottom, has none.) What is “green” about that?

  10. Interesting. I’m a life-long Hoosier. I’m 69yrs. I do some recycling. I think this is an unfair evaluation of my state. I know the air quality of Indy. I see how clean our state is. I see the recycling trucks doing pickups daily at homes. I see all the organic gardening going on. I wonder how valid this really is. I’m sure there are a lot of Hoosiers saddened by the reflection this has on our state. In looking at the other states, I have a lot of doubts. I have been to Seattle a few times. I agree with some of the others that this involves 25 states, but in everyones mind what stands out is Indy is the worst. And the damage is done. It can’t be fixed. The media can do so much harm. I think they should ask the many national groups that meet here every year what they think. There must be something redeeming to keep them coming back. As for me, I see so many people saving water, using there own bags when shopping, etc.. I also know there is not always a lot of honesty in these surveys. Too bad we have such a serious strike against us. It can help or some may decide why bother. Too bad. And how many people can afford the hybrid cars at this point?

  11. I had the understanding that the windmills in Indiana were owned by a foreign company and the electricity they generated was sent out of the state, to New York or somewhere.

    That aside, this is marketing research, looking at how individuals behave, and if chosen appropriately (randomly), 3,000 people can be a representative sample.

  12. Indiana and most other UN-GREEN states are not because the PEOPLE of these states are un-green, but the people live in a state where un-green industries are located. We have lower populations to complain about un-green power sources in our backyards. The technology for wind and solar are not yet there to power a steel mill. Hydo electric is only usable in certain parts of the country (and un-green to the flooded valleys), so gas, coal fired and nuclear are the only way to build the Prius and Leaf that the green states want to drive. Unless we Americans want to impoprt EVERYTHING, somewhere in the USA we must have manufacturing. Don’t criticize Indiana and other industrial states who have to have dirtier air and water until you in the green states are willing to move the industry in your backyard.

  13. I live in indiana and there is no way this site the least green state. I literally bet there is any state that’s less green than this one. Where I live it is nothing but fields and forests. I’ve seen Indianapolis and it makes up for all the big cities in other countries.

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