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Pay-as-You-Go Pays for the Environment

Pay-as-you-go (PAYG) is emerging as a winning consumption model for the environment. It does so in two ways. First, by charging for incremental use, PAYG discourages overconsumption often associated with flat rate pricing. Second, it incentivizes shared use of resources during peak periods in order to avoid excess investments in capacity that would otherwise be underutilized for much of the time.

In recent years, several PAYG models have emerged that are having a positive impact on the environment. For example, smart grid initiatives provide consumers with tiered pricing models that incentivize them to reduce or shift energy use during peak periods. Additionally, PAYG models in cloud computing allow consumers the flexibility to add computing capacity in real-time, while avoiding the need to overinvest in server capacity utilized only during peak periods.

This month, another consumption model got a big boost when the California Insurance Commission approved the launch of PAYG car insurance in the country’s largest car market. Beginning in February, 2011, California residents will be able to purchase insurance from State Farm and the Automobile Club of Southern California and pay based on how much – and how safely – they drive. The less they drive, the less they pay.

Such a model is enabled through the tracking of personal driving data. Consumers self-report miles driven (and validate periodically through inspection) or do so automatically through an active OnStar system or small telematics device that plugs into a diagnostic port under the dashboard. Insurance companies then effectively create personalized rates based on actual car use.

Potential benefits for the environment from PAYG are significant: The State of California estimates that subscribers may reduce miles driven by 10% or more, saving consumers money while reducing accidents, congestion and air pollution.

A wide variety of companies are now in a position to consider testing PAYG models with their customers, especially those that are price sensitive, tend to use a product less than the average or demand additional services during peak periods. While consumers may focus on saving money, the real benefits may be saved for the environment.

David Wigder is a lifelong environmentalist and has worked as a business strategist, environmental engineer and marketer in the space.  He holds an MBA from Columbia Business School, an MSE in environmental engineering from the University of Michigan and a BA from Northwestern University. He recently joined Ogilvy as Senior Director, Marketing Strategy.

David Wigder
David Wigder is a lifelong environmentalist and has worked as a business strategist, environmental engineer and marketer in the space.  He holds an MBA from Columbia Business School, an MSE in environmental engineering from the University of Michigan and a BA from Northwestern University. He recently joined OgilvyEarth as Senior Director, Marketing Strategy.
 
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One thought on “Pay-as-You-Go Pays for the Environment

  1. Maybe this is a good idea transition wise…

    But seriously… This idea as presented is NOT effective enough nor is it accountable enough to true cost accounting.

    For the most part it’s a feel-good solution that slightly changes peoples behavior. And while it’s a good start, it does nothing to address the dramatic decline in biodiversity, as well as the overall health / quality of life of the specific ecosystems we live and work in everyday!

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