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Sonoco Unveils Paper-Based Oil Can

Packaging firm Sonoco’s U.K. arm has designed a rigid, paper-based can that is capable of carrying liquid and results in a 20 percent reduction in greenhouse emissions during production over its metal predecessor, Packaging Europe reports.

The new container was designed specifically for a supplier of vehicle fluids looking to replace its costly metal container, the news site reports.

The screw-top, paper-based can is durable enough to last the product’s four year shelf life, and compared to its metal predecessor, costs less and is made of more sustainable materials.

As well as the greenhouse gas reduction, it also uses 27 percent less material weight at input and has 34 percent less energy inputs than the metal can’s production process.

Sonoco is set to deliver up to 2 million of the cans each year, the web site reports.

Staying in the U.K., it seems even luxury items will be showing off their green credentials this holiday season as grocery chain Tesco has unveiled a lighter, more material-efficient champagne bottle.

Tesco is now stocking De Vallois champagne in 830g bottles, rather than standard 900g, Business Green reports.

The lighter bottles are a bid to cut carbon emissions associated with the product, reduce waste glass and reduce transport costs, the web site reports.

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One thought on “Sonoco Unveils Paper-Based Oil Can

  1. The paper can is not anything new. We had them in the 60s and 70s, and went to the metal can because the paper cans would collapse when a oil spout was inserted, or a bottle opener,(church key) was used to open them with. They may have improved on the paper can making technology, but the concept and the product are not new at all.

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