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One thought on “Clean Energy Fuels Dallas Area Rapid Transit

  1. This article reads like a natural gas lobbyist’s talking points. 1) DART says CNG buses are better for the environment than diesel buses. I recommend they read the stories in the NY Times (“Study Finds Methane Leaks Negate Benefits of Natural Gas as a Fuel for Vehicles” 2/13/14) and USA Today (“Natural gas vehicles worse for climate than diesel ones?” 2/14/14) to see how natural gas is a very questionable replacement for diesel. 2) DART says they’re going to save taxpayers money by buying CNG buses. I suggest they read the recent story from the Houston Chronicle (“Economics of natural gas don’t always add up for fleets” 6/12/14). As one fleet manager stated about their experience with natural gas: “We’re not saving any money. I’m glad to hear we’re not the only one struggling with fuel mileage.” 3) DART says CNG buses are cleaner than clean diesels. I recommend they read the analysis from the Clean Air Task that compared new CNG buses with new clean diesel buses. The analysis, entitled “Clean Diesel versus CNG Buses: Cost, Air Quality, & Climate Impacts” (2012) found: “Both new diesel and new CNG buses have significantly lower emissions of NOx, PM, and HC than the older diesel buses that they replace. According to EPA’s MOVES emissions model a 2012 model year diesel bus emits 94% less NOx per mile, 98% less PM, and 89% less HC than a model year 2000 (12-year old) diesel bus. A model year 2012 CNG bus emits 80% less NOx, 99% less PM, and 100% less HC than a model year 2000 diesel bus.” I know natural gas (i.e. Boone Pickens) is a major economic issue in Texas with a good deal of political clout. But it’s alarming that DART has seemingly based their decision on questionable information.

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